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IMADO SHRINE

Imado Shrine is among the very popular shrines even in the Asakusa area. The reason for this is, its “matchmaking” effect. In fact, enshrined here are gods Izanagi and Izanami, who are, according to the “Kojiki” records of Japan’s ancient history, the first couple ever to marry.

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Known to have a “matchmaking” effect, the shrine is popular among young women

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Imado Shrine is among the very popular shrines even in the Asakusa area. The reason for this is, its “matchmaking” effect. In fact, enshrined here are gods Izanagi and Izanami, who are, according to the “Kojiki” records of Japan’s ancient history, the first couple ever to marry. Rumor has it that visiting the shrine will help you find your significant other! Today, the shrine is filled with young women and couples on weekends, thanks to its spiritual power.



Birthplace of fortune cat, “Manekineko”

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Imado is known as the birthplace of “Manekineko”. The statue of this fortune cat is said to possess the power to increase business prosperity. Ones with the right paw up attract economic fortune and happiness, while ones with the left paw up, bring in customers.
Around the shrine, you will find “Manekineko” couples with the right paw up, as they are also believed to “bring people together”.



Write the dream you want to achieve on the “Ema” tablet

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On your visit, make sure to take a look at the “Ema” wish tablets on display. “Ema” is a sort of a wooden tablet where visitors write the dreams or goals they want to reach. The custom of the shrine is to come back to report to the gods, once your goal is achieved. You might notice that the “Ema” of Imado Shrine is a rare round shape.

Why not write your wish on an “Ema”, to fully experience the Japanese shrine?



The land where Okita Soji of Shinsengumi spent his last moments

While it is often hidden behind the popular matchmaking anecdote, Imado Shrine has some other historical value. This area where the shrine is located, is actually where Okita Soji, member of Shinsengumi, the police force organized by the Bakufu during the Bakumatsu period, took his last breath. A stone monument dedicated to the police officer stands in the premise of the shrine.



INFORMATION
IMADO SHRINE
1-5-22, Imado, Taito-ku, Tokyo
15 min walk from Asakusa station
9:00~17:00
No Holodays
03-3872-2703
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writer:Nozomi



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